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Available now: "VIRUS" - The fully restored movie using RINNUVA to give this film the brightness and colors of the original movie"

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VIRUS

RINNUVA VERSION

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Director :
Screenplay :
Original Story :
Kinji Fukasaku
Koji Takada, Gregory Knapp and Kinji Fukasaku
Based on Fukkatsu no hi by Sakyo Komatsu
Cast :
Masao Kusakari
Sonny Chiba
George Kennedy
Robert Vaughn
Olivia Hussey
Olivia Hussey
Glenn Ford
Chuck Connors
Henry Silva
Edward James Olmos

Virus, known in Japan as Fukkatsu no Hi (復活の日, “Day of Resurrection”), is a 1980 Japanese post-apocalyptic science fiction film directed by Kinji Fukasaku and is based on Sakyo Komatsu’s 1964 novel of the same name.

Plot

When a shady transaction between an East German scientist, Dr. Krause, and a group of Americans involving a substance known as MM88 goes bad, the world faces a great danger.

MM88, a deadly virus, created accidentally by an American geneticist, that amplifies the potency of any other virus or bacterium it comes into contact with. The Americans recover the virus sample, which was stolen from a lab in the US the year before, but the virus is accidentally released after the plane transporting it crashes, creating a pandemic initially known as the “Italian Flu”.

Within seven months, virtually all the world’s population has died off. However, the virus is inactive at temperatures below -10 degrees Celsius, and the polar winter has spared the 855 men and eight women stationed in Antarctica. The British nuclear submarine HMS Nereid joins the scientists after sinking a Soviet submarine whose infected crew attempts to make landfall near Palmer Station.

Several years later, as the group is beginning to repopulate their new home, it is discovered that an earthquake will activate the Automated Reaction System (ARS) and launch the United States nuclear arsenal.

The Soviets have their own version of the ARS that will fire off their weapons in return, including one targeting Palmer Station. After all of the women and children and several hundred of the men are sent to safety aboard an icebreaker, Yoshizumi and Major Carter embark aboard the Nereid on a mission to shut down the ARS, protected from MM88 by an experimental vaccine.

The submarine arrives at Washington, D.C., and Yoshizumi and Carter make a rush for the ARS command bunker. However, they reach the room too late, and Carter dies in the rubble of the earthquake, deep in the bunker. Yoshizumi contacts the Nereid and tells them to try to save themselves, adding that the vaccine seems to have worked “If that still matters”. “At this point in time, life still matters,” the captain replies, telling Yoshizumi to stay where he is: He might be safe.

Washington is hit by a bomb, and the screen fills with atomic bomb after atomic bomb exploding. From there the movie’s ending diverges based upon the two cuts. In the American version, the screen goes black for a moment, and the end credits roll over footage of the Antarctic and a poignant song sung by a lone woman’s voice. The refrain is, “It’s not too late…” In the Japanese version, Yoshizumi survives the blast and walks back towards Antarctica. Upon reaching Tierra del Fuego in 1988,[5] he finds survivors from the icebreaker, immunized by a since-developed vaccine. He reunites with the woman he fell in love with, they embrace, and Yoshizumi declares “Life is wonderful.”

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